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Big History: or the Curse of Storytelling in Human Knowledge

Apr 08, 15 Big History: or the Curse of Storytelling in Human Knowledge

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Big Data is upon us, and it looks like it’s here to stay. Has Plato’s old dream of bias-free knowledge finally come true? Perhaps we’ve indeed found a way to make that Ancient Greek sage happy with our metaphysical data clouds, and infinite server farms. But does all this technology mean we’ve actually solved...

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Challenge the Past/Diversify the Future: Reflections on Historical Game Studies and the Study of Historical Representation Across Disciplines

Apr 07, 15 Challenge the Past/Diversify the Future: Reflections on Historical Game Studies and the Study of Historical Representation Across Disciplines

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This is a guest post by Adam Chapman, who is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Gothenburg’s Department of Education, Communication and Learning.  Adam has an interest in many aspects of games, popular history, collective memory and learning, with a main focus on historical games (i.e. games that represent the past) and...

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Seeing Through SimCity: Seeing Cities as Spreadsheets

Mar 24, 15 Seeing Through SimCity: Seeing Cities as Spreadsheets

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I heard a great talk on various open data projects from the City of Chicago’s Chief Data Officer a few weeks back. The city is doing some amazingly neat things to make civic data available and to make use of that data for a range of different uses of that data to improve decision making. When I looked Tom Schenk Jr. up on...

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History as it can be played: A new public history?

Feb 25, 15 History as it can be played: A new public history?

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The following is a guest post from Jamie Taylor. Jamie is currently an Interpretation Developer at The National Railway Museum in York, UK. He is especially interested in how procedural rhetoric can be used in the practise of history and how ‘interesting decisions’ can help facilitate counterfactual narratives. You can...

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APOTHEON: The Action Hero at the Heart of Greek Myth

Feb 18, 15 APOTHEON: The Action Hero at the Heart of Greek Myth

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 The hero is he who is immovably centred – Ralph Waldo Emerson     If I had to explain Apotheon to someone who doesn’t play video games, I’d say this: “imagine the figures of ancient Greek vase art, come to life…” This pithy description seems to best fit the game’s concept, and the childlike sense of...

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HullCraft: Using Minecraft and Archives for Learning about the Past

Dec 18, 14 HullCraft: Using Minecraft and Archives for Learning about the Past

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The following is a guest post from Hannah Rice, a digital heritage specialist with an architectural history and computer games background. Hannah’s MSc dissertation was on computer games and architectural history engagement. Hannah is currently working in the archives at the Hull History Centre, in Kingston upon Hull, UK....

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Valiant Hearts, The Great War, and The Shaping of Historical Memory

Dec 10, 14 Valiant Hearts, The Great War, and The Shaping of Historical Memory

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The following is a guest post from Christopher Sawula an Early American Historian of Class, Society, and Culture. CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Alabama. You can find him @CGSaw on twitter. Valiant Hearts is the only war game I would ever teach students as a historical text. Focusing on the emotion and personal...

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