Causal Models as Historical Toys: Playing Pastwatch 3

Jan 18, 12

Posted by in Articles

This is the third post in a four part series exploring how the story of Orson Scot Card’s book Pastwatch gets readers to play with and explore their own models of the past. The first post discussed the way the book’s claim that we are living in an altered history helps us approach the past as a strange and peculiar set...

read more

Play as Hermeneutic: A Forgery Game for History Students

Jun 02, 11

Posted by in Articles

At last year’s THATcamp at the Center for History and New Media I helped facilitate  a mini-game jam. In an hour the 20 or so people that participated came up with 4-5 kinda cool ideas for humanities games. Each of the groups promised to post something about their game concept. As the session leader (read:me) failed to post I...

read more

Practical Necromancy* Begins with Latin

Feb 23, 11 Practical Necromancy* Begins with Latin

Posted by in Articles

In my previous ‘Practical Necromancy’ post, I made the argument why we should toy with history, using the Netlogo agent based modeling environment. Let me tell you today what happened when I introduced the idea of simulating the past to my first year students. The phrase ‘digital history’ does indeed appear...

read more

Operation LAPIS: Collaborative Roleplaying in the Immersion

Jan 25, 11 Operation LAPIS: Collaborative Roleplaying in the Immersion

Posted by in Articles

As I introduced in a previous post, at the heart of Operation LAPIS is a collaborative role-playing experience that continuously and actively reinforces the primary learning objectives for the course: learning how to read, think, and act like a Roman based on an understanding of the culture as a whole. The crossword maker is one...

read more

Practical Necromancy* for Beginners

Jan 20, 11 Practical Necromancy* for Beginners

Posted by in Articles

My students – especially my first year students – sometimes wish for direct, first person testimony. Wouldn’t it make life easier if we could just interrogate them, read what they thought, directly? Seeing as how most of the people in question (in my classes) are Romans, this would require a wee bit of necromancy,...

read more