The Museum in Animal Crossing

May 26, 20

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This is a guest post by Alvina Lai. Alvina holds an MS in Library and Information Science from Pratt Institute, and a BFA in Photography and BA in Creative Writing from The New School. Their writing appears in The Mary Sue, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, and the NYT’s “Metropolitan Diary”; all of which can be found on...

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What’s in a Name?

Aug 14, 13

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This is a mostly serious and occasionally tongue-in-cheek open response to Kevin Bacon’s (@fauxtoegrafik) thoughtful and honest blog post “Nameless Gameless.” I’m hoping it will spark some open dialogue between a variety of folks interested in cultural heritage and meaningful play (and of course, those...

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No More Chocolate-covered Broccoli: Collaboration between Game Designers and Historians is Key

Jan 23, 13

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The following post is a short paper I wrote for a panel discussion on creating game experiences at Civil War historic sites. Our moderator suggested that we share our papers for further discussion and comment before the panel. Please join in the discussion, all comments and concerns are greatly appreciated! My postings on this site...

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The Babylon of Babylonian Twins

Oct 17, 12

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Thanks to the game Babylonian Twins, iPhone and Android users can explore creative renditions of monuments in and near ancient Babylon, including the legendary hanging gardens, the Ishtar gate and processional way, and the ziggurat some believe to be the Biblical Tower of Babel.  As players guide the twin princes Nasir and Blasir...

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Enjoy High Tea? Lessons Learned from its Distribution and Evaluation

Jul 25, 12

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The premise of the game High Tea is simple: buy opium from Bengal, India, smuggle that opium into Chinese ports and sell it for silver, and use silver to buy tea for Britain. If players, acting as nineteenth-century British merchants, don’t meet the increasing demand for tea, then the mood of the English nation turns against...

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